Orange you glad I fixed this shirt?

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And here we have another thrift store find that needed an update. I’m pretty sure my sister thought I was doing drugs when I picked this one out and said it needed to come home. I’m pretty sure she thinks that about a lot of the things I try to bring home. We both actually have knack for seeing what things could be instead of what they actually are, but we don’t always have the same vision. I think some of that might be because she doesn’t really sew. Well, she does a little bit, but mainly straight lines.

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There it is in all of it’s glory. Extra long short sleeves, shoulder pads, and no basically shape.

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Goodbye shoulder pads and too long sleeves.

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I split the sleeve right down the middle and sewed in the crochet-like trim. It was actually a belt before it became the detail on my shirt.

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I cut the shirt right down the back, which then became the front and created a new neck line. It sort of came to a v but also would cross over similar to a wrap dress, but would be sewn into place instead of tied.

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I added little pleat tuck thingys on both sides under the bust.

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Here is it finished. I paired it with purples skinny pants that don’t actually appear to be purple in these pictures. I wore a mustard colored tank underneath and one of my favorite feather necklaces.

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And here we have a mirror selfie to show the detail down the sleeves.

I really like how it turned out, and enjoyed wearing it today. I think it will end up being a great shirt for the summer time. It was light and breezy and loose and fun.

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5 thoughts on “Orange you glad I fixed this shirt?

  1. Brian

    Hi. I stumbled across your blog recently while doing some random web searching. This particular project is amazing. I design and sew men’s kilts (modern and utilitarian, not so much the traditional Scottish tartan, mostly camo, cotton twill, etc), so I know what it’s like working without a pattern — just fabric and math. I’ve never seen a garment undergo this much altering. Pretty incredible. Most sewing blogs and sites tend to be a little too girly for me, your’s included, but I can totally appreciate skill and funky designs. Keep up the good work. Cheers!

    • Thanks so much. I usually don’t work with patterns. I get tired of following the instructions and think that I have a better plan. I’m pretty girly, sorry. It just happens to some of us. The next few ideas I have are still super girly, but I love getting positive feedback. Good luck with your kilts! Where can I see these?

      • Brian

        It’s just a hobby, not anything I do for a living. I have a few pics from when I was making my last one on my FB page, but only a few. I made this one for the Prez of a local beard & stache club:

        And the first one I made for myself, straight out of the dryer and unironed, so the pleats look kinda iffy (and it shrunk so it doesn’t exactly fit anymore haha!

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